Driving (and being a Pedestrian) in New York vs Shanghai – Part 2

Below is JiaYou’s view of the differences between the U.S. and Chinese drivers’ license processes. Since this is really geared toward purely a Chinese audience, it’s completely in Chinese language. – AddingOil

JiaYou:

在美国和中国考驾照的区别:

中国考驾照:

考驾照前需要持有当地的临时居住证和体检,通过后就可以开始参加考试。

JiaYou practicing her driving skills

中国的驾照考试分为四次 科目1:笔试(含2次),科目2:小路考试(含2次,当天考), 科目3:大路考试, 科目4:笔试(含2次) Continue reading “Driving (and being a Pedestrian) in New York vs Shanghai – Part 2”

Driving (and being a Pedestrian) in New York vs Shanghai – Part 1

Adding Oil:

One of the more subtle differences between New York and Shanghai (which can be generalized to Western and Asian societies overall) is the relationship between motorists and pedestrians.

AddingOil’s perils as a pedestrian – to be fair, this is just illustrative as this photo actually wasn’t taken in China!

In the U.S., pedestrians are treated as the equivalent of an endangered species. They are to be protected at all costs (admittedly, this is probably related to being a highly litigious society), and at times coddled (which is very much the case on the West Coast). In fact, in many East Coast cities, such as NY and Boston, pedestrians can even have an arrogant demeanor, assuming right of way without regard to their physical safely. If you honk at them when they are not walking with the light, they’ll actually glare at you and act indignant!

In China, in sharp contrast, pedestrians are simply the lowest level in the food chain (i.e., plankton). Continue reading “Driving (and being a Pedestrian) in New York vs Shanghai – Part 1”